Dachshund Coats

How often do we bathe our dogs? Very rarely, only if they get into something stinky and so dirty. If they get into heavy mud, we might rinse them, dry and brush them. Giving frequent baths and using shampoos is not recommended as it strips the skin of natural oils leaving it dry and itchy. Our dogs are allowed to swim as they want - no shampoos are used in that process!

 

Dachshunds produce a special oil in their hair that serves as an insulating layer to protect it against the elements. Bathing removes this oil which makes the coat softer but also leaves your dog more vulnerable. So bathe your dog occasionally, but not too often. We recommend 2-3 x a year at most.

 

Dachshunds come in 3 Coat Types:

 

Dachshunds do shed, but when it comes to the amount of shedding, they are generally considered low to moderate shedders.

 

Dachshund haircuts are simple, low maintenance and not required at all for many pet doxies!

Each of these hair types has a different growth cycle.

 

The smooth coat grows and sheds throughout the year, which means you’ll see some hair come out on a regular basis.

 

The long-haired coat has an undercoat that sheds seasonally, but the hairs on this type of Dachshund take a while to grow, so they don’t shed a lot.

 

Meanwhile, wire-haired Dachshunds also shed seasonally because they have a double coat. Overall, they may shed less than the other two types, especially if groomed properly.

Smooth or Short

 

Smooths or short-hairs have a short, tight coat. Short, smooth and shining. Should be neither too long nor too thick.

 

Shedding: The smooth coat grows and sheds throughout the year, which means you’ll see some hair come out on a regular basis.

 

Grooming: Smooth Dachshunds can have a slight doggy odor. For grooming they are pretty minimal just give them a weekly rub down with a grooming mitt and polish off with a chamois cloth and you are ready to go! This also helps to distribute the oils from the hair root to tip (See how shiny Anthony is below)

 

Pictured are a Red Smooth and a Black & Tan Smooth

Longhair

 

The sleek, glistening, often slightly wavy hair is longer under the neck and on the fore chest, the underside of the body, the ears, and behind the legs. The coat gives the dog an elegant appearance.

 

Shedding: The long-haired coat has an undercoat that sheds seasonally, but the hairs on this type of Dachshund take a while to grow, so they don’t shed a lot.

 

Grooming: Carefully brush weekly with a wire-pinned brush to remove any tangles that may have formed. Start at the head and work backwards. Once you have groomed the coat thoroughly, use the soft bristled brush to remove any loose hairs. Always brush in the direction the hair grows, not against the growth pattern. Grooming removes already-loose fur and helps redistribute the dog’s natural skin oils, to keep the coat healthier. Longer-haired dogs benefit from a slicker brush or pin brushes for tangles.

 

Even long-haired Dachshunds really only require clipping hair into its natural patterns if your showing your dog or want it in a show cut, pets just need occasional brushing.

 

Pictured are a Isabella & Tan Piebald Longhair and a Cream Longhair.

Wirehair

 

With the exception of jaw, eyebrows, and ears, the whole body is covered with a uniform tight, short, thick, rough, hard outer coat but with finer, somewhat softer, shorter hairs (undercoat) everywhere distributed between the coarser hairs. The distinctive facial furnishings include a beard and eyebrows. On the ears the hair is shorter than on the body, almost smooth. The general arrangement of the hair is such that the wire haired Dachshund, when viewed form a distance, resembles the smooth.

 

Shedding: The wire-haired coat has an undercoat that sheds seasonally, but the hairs on this type of Dachshund take the longest to grow, so they don’t shed a lot. Even wire haired Dachshunds are not hypoallergenic dogs but shed the least of all three Dachshund coats.

 

Grooming: Wire-haired Dachshunds don’t require as much maintenance as the long-haired Dachshund, Wire-haired Dachshund grooming doesn't need to be too frequent or complex, simply an occasional brushing and coat stripping two x a year for pets. What is stripping you ask? Simply a deep thorough brushing with the right undercoat rake that plucks out the dead hairs. Stripping allows a new coat to grow in and reduces shedding.

 

Some groomers will tell you that you need to come in twice a month to maintain the coat, simply not true for pets and not even as much for show prospects if done twice a year. The two below were only ever stripped twice a year and they look wonderful.

 

A good undercoat rake for wire coat stripping is the Coat-King by Mars. It pulls the hair out quickly, and you can groom a wire much faster this way than by hand. There is a lot of good info about this tool at http://www.groomersmall.com/coat_kings.htm use the 20-blade. An Andis de-shedding rake is also a wonderful tool, and a bit cheaper.

 

Pictured are a Chocolate & Tan Wirehair and a Red Sable Wirehair.

Soft Wirehair

 

Ideal wire haired coats do not breed true, Even when both parents have ideal coats, most likely their pups will have a whole range of coats. You will often get a very good coat, and some with soft/silky coats.

 

Soft Wire: These are Improper Wire coats. Soft wires are still considered wirehairs. They do not have the correct coat according to AKC standards for working/showing.

Silky Wirehair

 

Silky Coat: These are Improper Wire coats. Silky wires are still considered wirehairs. They do not have the correct coat according to AKC standards for working/showing. They are the result of a wirehair carrying long-hair or a wire hair being bred with a long-hair or dog carrying long-hair. They only have one coat that is a mix between wire and long. They require more grooming and will need a good trimming, at least around the eyes and feet every once in awhile. However they do shed allot less then traditional wire coats.

 

Pictured are a Dilute Red Silky Wirehair and a Chocolate & Tan Silky Wirehair.

Explanation of Dominant & Recessive Coat Genes

 

WIRE: The wire coat gene is dominant to both the smooth and longhair. (will be impacted by a longhair gene resulting in silky coats)

SMOOTH: The smooth coat gene is dominant to a longhair.

LONGHAIR: is a recessive gene.

NOTES: A 5 generation pedigree is recommended for determining future breeding. The pedigree will usually but not always tell  each dogs type of coat.

 

Cross breeding of coats is allowed in the U.S.

 

EXAMPLE: at the end of the dogs name there may be the following letters;

 

      MS for miniature smooth

      ML for miniature longhair

      MW for miniature wirehair

 

(substitute the 'M' with 'S' for Standard Dachshunds, sometimes the first letter is not used)

FIND​ US
YYoutube4.png
YFacebook.gif
YInstagram.gif

All Graphics and Content Copyrighted.

Copyright ©1992-present. All rights reserved.